pinterest for b2b marketing by Photo by Graeme Nicholl

Can You Use Pinterest for B2B Marketing?

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Many B2B marketers understand social media can be a powerful tool in their efforts to connect with customers and prospects, but most stick to the basics — Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook — and may ignore other valuable social media marketing channels. For example, contrary to popular belief, Pinterest isn’t just for crafts, clothes and cooking. Businesses are finding that with a little effort and some emphasis on your visuals, you can use Pinterest for B2B marketing.

“Pinterest drives traffic, leads, sales. And, they’re getting better and better at doing those things by improving their search algorithms and improving smart pins,” says Robyn Showers, social media manager at marketing software provider HubSpot, a B2B brand that uses Pinterest as part of its marketing efforts.

“Pinterest is really unique as a social media platform because it’s almost more search engine than social platform,” Showers says. “A pin on Pinterest has a much longer half life than a tweet. We’re talking months versus minutes.”

When you pin content, it spreads far beyond your brand’s Pinterest followers, Pinterest’s Kevin Knight explains. Pinterest found the average pin is repinned 11 times.

Pinterest is a community that resonates with users — including business buyers — and is one you should consider using to connect with your company’s B2B audience.

The Power of Pictures

Every piece of content you produce needs a visual element: Blog posts should be accompanied by photos, illustrations or graphics. Landing pages need some type of image to draw people’s attention.

Having these visual elements in your content makes it easy to pin them on one of your company’s Pinterest boards. You can also add flair with a uniquely cropped photo and a catchy pin title. Up your game by creating infographics, Showers suggests.

“Pinterest is a great platform that lets you connect with your audience through images, and, as the old saying goes, a picture is worth a thousand words,” says Lauren Santilli, communications and events coordinator for Project Bread – The Walk for Hunger.

Here’s an example. Say you have 10 employees who volunteered to read to kids at a nearby school. You could create an infographic about the number of books the kids read, the number of kids at the school, the number of volunteers you have and the rate of literacy in your area. Add in the amount of money your company spends on books for kids and you have a great infographic that showcases your commitment to the community.

“We like to use pins and create pin boards with images and text that showcase our programs,” Santilli said. “As a nonprofit, this is a huge opportunity for another company to understand more what our organization does and how they can get involved as an organization to help the cause.”

Images can also be a gateway to teaching your audience more about your company’s products. For example, GE does an exceptional job informing pinners about both its B2C and B2B products.

B2B Boards Don’t Have to Be Straightlaced

B2B audiences are made up of people and people often enjoy some fun — even when they’re consuming content related to their jobs. Add a little something fun to keep your audience on their toes, surprise them and keep them looking for more. For example, HootSuite’s #HootsuiteLife board gives users an insider’s view of its staff and their activities.

The fun doesn’t have to be hard to find. Just use the knowledge base already available inside your company, like GE’s board about geniuses and genius ideas. You can also share fun, engaging information that’s tangentially tied to your brand the way GE did with this infographic that explains how to generate electricity with a pickle.

People are Probably Already Pinning Your Content

If you’re creating content with images already, there’s a good chance people are pinning your content on Pinterest. You can see what users are pinning from your website by typing your url at the end of this link: www.pinterest.com/source/ (for example, http://www.pinterest.com/source/repcapitalmedia.com/).

People are on Pinterest for a variety of reasons — often to find something to buy or to find a solution to a problem, Showers says. “This makes it a particularly wonderful place for content marketers and retailers alike to be.”

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